Hire your Data Analysis consultant in 48 hours

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Data Analysis specialists to projects that need execution, now. Reliable. Targeted. Fast.
Selected clients and partners
Düsseldorf, Germany Strategy, M&A
Senior
12 years experience
  • Data Analysis
  • Financial Modeling
  • Business Strategy
  • M&A
  • +24
Hire Dace
Strategy, M&A
Associate
5 years experience
  • Data Analysis
  • Financial Modeling
  • Business Strategy
  • M&A
  • +11
Hire Anant
Zurich, Switzerland Strategy, FinTech
Senior
8 years experience
  • Data Analysis
  • Financial Modeling
  • M&A
  • Corporate Finance
  • +7
Hire Anand
New York City Metropolitan Area Strategy
Associate
5 years experience
  • Data Analysis
  • Financial Modeling
  • Financial Analysis
  • Due Diligence
  • +10
Hire Nicholas
New York, New York, United States Strategy
Manager
6 years experience
  • Data Analysis
  • Financial Modeling
  • Financial Analysis
  • Valuation
  • +5
Hire Shulai
Irvine, CA, USA Strategy, FinTech
Senior
15 years experience
  • Data Analysis
  • Financial Modeling
  • Business Strategy
  • Corporate Finance
  • +25
Hire Augusto
UK M&A, FinTech
Analyst
3 years experience
  • Data Analysis
  • Business Strategy
  • M&A
  • Corporate Finance
  • +12
Hire Juraj
Nicosia, Cyprus Strategy, M&A
Associate
6 years experience
  • Data Analysis
  • Business Strategy
  • Competitive Analaysis
  • Business Analysis
  • +1
Hire Thomas

What do Data Analysis consultants do?

Our data analysis consultants will help you examine transactions, such as stocks, index prices, shares, and even currency values and transaction costs with the goal of finding patterns or relationships to guide business and investment decisions.

The world's largest network of Data Analysis consultants

Fintalent is the invite-only community for top-tier independent M&A consultants and Strategy professionals. Our Fintalents serve clients in North America, LATAM, Europe, MENA, and APAC.

Hire global freelance M&A consultants and Strategy experts with extensive experience in over 2,900 industries. Our platform allows you to build your team of independent M&A advisors and Strategy specialists in 48 hours. Welcome to the future of Mergers & Acquisitions!

Talent with experience at
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Why should you hire Data Analysis experts with Fintalent?

Trusted Network

Every Fintalent has been vetted manually.

Ready in 48h​​​

Hire efficiently. Your M&A team is ready in 2 days or less.​​​​

Specialized Skills​

Fintalents are best-in-class - and specialized in 2,900+ industries.​

Code of Ethics​​

We guarantee highest integrity and ethical principles.​​​

Frequently asked questions

What clients usually engage your Data Analysis Consultants?

We work with clients from all over the world. Our clients range from enterprise and corporate clients to companies that are backed by Private Equity or Venture Capital funds. Furthermore, we work directly with Family Offices, Private Equity firms, and Asset Managers. Most of our enterprise clients have dedicated Corporate Development, M&A, and Strategy divisions which are utilizing our pool of Data Analysis talent to add on-demand and flexible resources, expertise, or staff to their in-house team.

How is Fintalent different?

Fintalent is not a staffing agency. We are a community of best-in-class Data Analysis professionals, highly specialized within their domains. We have streamlined the process of engaging the best Data Analysis talent and are able to provide clients with Data Analysis professionals within 48 hours of first engaging them. We believe that our platform provides more value for Corporates, Ventures, Private Equity and Venture Capital firms, and Family Offices.

Our Hiring Process – What do ‘Community-Approach’ and ‘Invite-to-Apply’ mean?

‘Invite-to-Apply’ is the process by which we shortlist candidates for the majority of projects on our platform. Often, due to the confidential nature of our clients’ projects, we do not release projects to our whole platform but using the matching technology and expertise of our internal team we select candidates who are the best fit for our clients’ needs. This approach also ensures engagement with our community of professionals on the Fintalent platform, and is a benefit both to our clients and independent professionals, as our freelancers have direct access to the roles best suited to their skills and are more likely to take an interest in a project if they have been sought out directly. In addition, if a member of our community is unavailable for a project but knows someone whose skill set perfectly fits the brief, they are able to invite them to apply for the role, utilizing the personal networks of each talent on our platform.

Which skills and expertise do your Fintalents have?

The Fintalents are hand-picked and vetted Data Analysis professionals, speak over 55 languages, and have professional experience in all geographical markets. Our Data Analysis consultants’ experience ranges from 3+ years as analysts at top investment banks and Strategy consultancies, to later career C-level executives. The average working experience is 6.9 years and 80% of all Fintalents range from 3-12 years into their careers.

Our Data Analysis consultants have experience in leading firms as well as interfacing with clients and wider corporate structures and management. What makes our Data Analysis talent pool stand out is the fact that they have technical backgrounds in over 2,900 industries.

How does the screening and onboarding of your Data Analysis talent work?

Fintalent.io is an invite-only platform and we believe in the power of referrals and a closed-loop community. Members of our community are able to invite a small number of professionals onto the platform. In addition, our team actively scouts for the best talent who have experience in investment banking or have worked at a global top management consultancy. All of our community-referred talent and scouted talent are subject to a rigorous screening process. As such, over the last 18 months totaling more than 750 hours of onboarding calls, of which only 40% have received an invite-link after the call.

What happens if I am not satisfied with my Data Analysis consultant’s work?

During your initial engagement with a member of our Fintalent talent pool with no risk. If you are not satisfied with the quality of your hire for any reason then we are able to find a replacement at short notice. There is no minimum commitment per project, but generally projects last at least 5 days and can last 12+ months.

Everything you need to know about Data Analysis

What is data analysis?

Data analysis is the use of data in order to make better business decisions. This means that you will look at large sets of data, analyze them and discover trends or patterns. In this way, you can predict future events or changes with a certain degree of certainty.

Traditionally, data analysis has involved a process of manually gathering a large quantity of information to get a firm’s figures. But our world is changing observes Fintalent’s data analysis consultants. With agile technology, new ways of processing information are arising that enable firms to extract meaning from the volume of data available. This allows them to look beyond raw numbers and focus on what is actually going on in the business.

Firms can scale this sort of analysis by using more advanced technologies such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, neural networks, predictive analytics and real-time self-learning algorithms (or even combining these). These solutions may sound daunting, but they can help firms make much better decisions based on data rather than intuition or opinion.

Let’s take an example from the hospitality industry. Hotels have long relied on a combination of intuition and poor data when deciding where to build new properties. In an interview with the Harvard Business Review, TripAdvisor’s VP of Data Sciences June Lee described how a major hotel chain wanted to open a particular property in several cities across America but was torn between two locations. It had no data on how successful they were as a location, so decided to simply go with which one got the most emails. Over the following weeks, sales at that property increased by 20 per cent.

“It was the kind of thing you could not do with just intuition,” Ms Lee said. “It was something we could have done with data. [The hotel chain] used its intuition about which locations seemed to be most popular and put up a sign… but it wasn’t predictive intelligence that told them that tens of thousands of people would communicate by email to say ‘please not in this city.’”

Data analytics can also help firms make important business decisions. In the insurance industry, small changes in a company’s data can mean significant changes to a firm’s risk profile. In one case, an insurer took over half a year to respond to a change in its customers’ data that had occurred just days before. Had it done so sooner, it would have saved over $5m in losses from fraud.

Firms are coming to use data analysis for other areas too. Traditionally, governments have been largely unable to tackle complex issues such as crime and healthcare because of their limited IT capacities and the lack of human intelligence. But recent improvements to AI technology have enabled governments to use automated data analysis and machine learning to tackle tough issues.

You might not realise it, but many of the things you do every day are already heavily influenced by data analysts. From the apps you use, such as Facebook and Tinder, to your favourite TV shows – everything is being translated into a set of numbers right now. It’s no surprise then that data analytics is one of the fastest growing sectors in the job market.

How do firms use data?

Firms turn raw numbers into something that can be used in everyday business decisions by running them through different tools such as dashboards and reports. But the quality of this data is heavily dependent on the quality of its acquisition. The way firms gather what they then call “intelligence” is not new – although the actual process has seen many changes over time.

More than 150 years ago, when Britain was first developing as an industrial power, private organisations were already beginning to collect data on their customers and prospects. This included information such as their age, income and location, but it also extended to more intimate details such as how many people lived in a household and how much they earned.

This early data collection was funded by the philanthropies of the day. These organisations had a habit of writing down and sharing their collected data (called “Gossman coding”), which helped make it easier to apply analytics processes to their figures.

In the early 1900s, gathering data with a key-in-the-loop or clickstream approach began in earnest. Companies selected a sample of people from a wide range of professions and tracked how many times they visited their website, what they bought and how much it cost them. This enabled firms to create profiles of customers who were more likely to persuade them to buy something in the future – and also helped them tailor their online experience accordingly.

By the 1950s, firms were more sophisticated in their attitudes towards data collection. Newer techniques such as correlation analysis provided a way to correlate measurements of customers and prospects, which allowed firms to access far larger quantities of information. This led to the development of new techniques such as value-added analytics (VAN), which live on in many branches of the business today.

VAN allowed businesses to build models based on their users’ behaviour and establish correlations between them, allowing them to see how buyers differ from non-buyers and what factors drive sales. Data collected this way became known as “actionable intelligence” – meaning that it could be applied immediately in order to drive revenue or other business goals.

VAN allowed firms to build models based on their users’ behaviour and establish correlations between them, allowing them to see how buyers differ from non-buyers and what factors drive sales.

But for all its apparent usefulness, VAN was something of a fad that didn’t last long. It was too complex to apply in real-time and it was difficult for firms to justify the cost of collecting data over a large number of customers. It also saw little adoption outside the US and UK in those days, which made it harder for foreign companies to use the techniques. The term “data analytics” started being used by firms around 1964 but wasn’t mainstream until much later.

Before the dotcom crash at the turn of the millennium, organisations devoted most of their time to getting a single point-of-view on their market and customers. This led to a boom in companies such as Market Research and Customer Relationship Management. Companies were finally able to see all their interactions with each of their customers at one time (a realisation that would later be called “big data”).

But what forced firms to keep on collecting greater and greater quantities of data was the emergence of machine learning in the early 2000s. Firms now had enough data about each piece of information that they could employ machine learning techniques to generate new insights from it. In essence, machine learning allowed companies to use data they had collected in the past to improve their products and services in the future.

This new ability to use data in real-time became a cornerstone of big data analytics. It could be used to make predictions about what customers needed based on their needs and buying history and to recommend related products or services that customers might be interested in purchasing.

These techniques are mainly used by firms engaged in digital marketing, but they can also be applied to other sectors such as healthcare, transportation and finance. For example, FinTech firms have begun using machine learning techniques (such as those used by Google’s search function) for calculating loan payments.

In addition to machine learning, we also see a boom in more traditional data analytics techniques such as traditional correlation analysis and VAN.

This latest wave shows just how much of an impact firms can have if they choose the right tools and use them correctly.

How is data changing?

Although the basics of big data analytics have remained the same since the 1950s (namely, it’s a way of analysing big quantities of data), other aspects have become increasingly complex. For many organisations, this has created confusion about what exactly companies should be looking for when it comes to analysing their marketing data. This can often be down to firms’ limited understanding of these new technologies.

One of the most common types of big data analytics is predictive analytics. Predictive analytics, or “event stream processing”, automatically looks for patterns in what has happened in the past in order to predict what is likely to happen next.

Based on a user’s online search history and their purchases, online stores use predictive analytics to suggest other products that they might like to purchase. The user then provides feedback on the accuracy of their suggestions and new data is collected. This continues until the system reaches a point where it can accurately predict what users want before they even know themselves.

A company can use predictive analytics in order to determine how many more people they need to advertise to in order to reach certain price points. For example, a retailer might use predictive analytics in order to determine the price point at which a product is expected to sell. In turn, this information can be used to target advertisements and promotions in line with the predicted demand.

Similarly, a company that is surveying potential customers can use predictive analytics in order to predict what questions are likely to be asked by potential customers. This allows the firm decide where it should conduct research and how much time it needs for its surveys.

Data analysis is now a crucial part of every firm’s operations, and it will continue to grow in importance. It may seem baffling at first, but given the emerging strategic role of data in a firm’s operations and its acquisition of such strong figures as Chief Data Officers, data analysis should be able to see steady growth for the foreseeable future.

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Hire the best Data Analysis specialists in 2,900+ industries

Fintalent is the invite-only community for top-tier M&A consultants and Strategy talent. Hire global Data Analysis consultants with extensive experience in over 2,900 industries. Our platform allows you to build your team of independent Data Analysis specialists in 48 hours. Welcome to the future of Mergers & Acquisitions!